Vacation!

Vacation!

Vacation – a fine word!  And a fine invention it is, the origin of which I am uncertain, but grateful for its existence none the less!  Diane and I were fortunate to be able to string together 16 days of vacation this year.  We visited Hendersonville, North Carolina, Savannah, Georgia, Charleston, South Carolina, Holden Beach, North Carolina, Black Mountain, North Carolina, Asheville, North Carolina, and Knoxville, Tennessee in that order.  We saw mountains, tidewater and piedmont lands, islands, inter-coastal waterways, more mountains, the bluegrass of Kentucky and the ocean.  We visited the only remaining aunt from my mother’s family and her daughter in Charleston.  She celebrated her 93rd birthday in May.  (Last summer we got to visit the only remaining aunt and uncle in my father’s family when we traveled to Mansfield, Ohio.)  We also spent some time with Diane’s cousin and his family as well as Candy and Dick Wilson in North Carolina before crashing one evening at the home of very close friends, Joe and Amy, in Knoxville.  It was a great trip!  I appreciate T. and Ben providing the Sunday morning messages.

Vacation is indeed a fine word.  To vacate one’s place and circumstances in order to rest, relax, recharge, and re-enter the “routine” world is important to the health of people.  We all need time away to allow our bodies, minds and spirits to refuel their enthusiasm for life and all that it encompasses.  Sometimes that comes when sitting on the porch watching the waves of the ocean roll endlessly toward the shoreline or when walking through the foam left behind.  In those moments we are encouraged to consider the vastness of the ocean knowing it touches the shores of distant lands and people at that very moment.  The universe is no less vast touching stars and planets that are even light years distant, beyond what we are able to view through our most powerful telescopes.

Sometimes we are refueled by words written to challenge our imaginations, or tickle our funny bones or send shivers up our spines.  We can find fuel for the soul in so many ways in the world.  Being unengaged from the routine of work or school is an important part of encouraging this to happen.  The same holds true for our faith community.  Sometimes we need to be disengaged for a time to refresh and then to reconnect.  So, if you find it necessary to be absent from worship, it’s okay, just don’t let that become your habit. 

DEVELOPED BY COLLISION MEDIA